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ASP Lithics Lab


Katipunan Arkeologist ng Pilipinas, Inc.


National Museum of the Philippines


University of the Philippines Webpage

University of the Philippines (Diliman)


The Solheim Foundation

Talastasang Bakas (Sayt ni Dr. Z.A. Salazar)

Bagong Kasaysayan


MOVER: An Erasmus Mundus Program

Erasmus Mundus Master in Quaternary and Prehistory


Human Origins Patrimony in Southeast Asia

 

 

 

Kimberly Plomp

Dr. Kimberly Plomp

Associate Professor
kplomp@up.edu.ph

Research Interest:
I am a biological anthropologist whose work intersects with several related fields, including bioarchaeology, palaeopathology, paleoanthropology, and evolutionary medicine. I have my BA in biological anthropology from the University of Alberta, my MSc in Human Osteology and Palaeopathology from the University of Bradford, and my PhD in Anthropology and Archaeology from Durham University. Since then, I have held two postdoc positions at Simon Fraser University and a Marie Skłodowska-Curie European Fellowship at the University of Liverpool. I am now excited to start my next chapter in ASP! My research interests align under an overriding theme: investigating how evolutionary adaptations have shaped modern human skeletal variation and how this variation influences human health and disease. To answer these questions, I analyze the morphological variation of the skeleton of archaeological and modern humans, extant non-human primates, and extinct fossil hominins using cutting-edge approaches, such as photogrammetry and geometric morphometrics. The outcomes of my research are not only relevant for the field of biological anthropology, but also have the potential to impact the lives of people today. For more information on what I do, please check out my webpage at DrKimberlyPlomp.com.

Area of Specialization:
Bioarchaeology, palaeopathology, evolutionary medicine, biological anthropology, human evolution, functional morphology

Current and Previous Projects:
- The Evolutionary Shape Hypothesis
- The Possible Evolutionary Origins of the Chiari Malformation

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The Ancestral Shape Hypothesis

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Iceland: Physical Anthropology, Colonization, and Evolution

Archaeology Courses Taught

Archaeology 240

Human Paleontology


Publications

In press for release in April, 2022

Plomp KA, Roberts CA, Bentley G, Elton S (eds). Evolving Health: Palaeopathology and Evolutionary Medicine. Oxford University Press.

Revisions requested

Plomp KA, Owen J, Dobney K, Collard M. Where’s the signal? Mandibular morphology and diet in primates and what it can tell us about fossil hominins. Folia Primatologica.

Accepted with minor revision

Collard M, Plomp KA, Dobney K. Back pain in evolutionary perspective: updating a classic hypothesis. Biological Theory.

Accepted

Gilmour R, Plomp KA. The Changing Shape of Palaeopathology: The Contribution of Skeletal Shape Analyses to Investigations of Pathological Conditions. Yearbook of Biological Anthropology.

2021

Plomp KA, Dobney K, Collard M. A 3D basicranial shape-based assessment of local and continental northwest European ancestry among 5th to 9th century CE Anglo-Saxons. PLOS One 16(6): e0252477.

2013

Plomp KA, Dobney K, Gestdóttir H, Price N, Collard M 2021) The composition of the founding population of Iceland: a basicranial perspective. PLOS One 16(2): e0246059.

2013

Plomp KA, Dobney K, Collard M 2020) Spondylolysis and spinal adaptations for bipedalism: The Overshoot Hypothesis. Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health 2020(1): 35-44.

2019

Plomp KA, Strand Viðarsdóttir U, Weston D, Dobney K, Collard M. 3D shape analyses of extant primate and fossil hominin vertebrae support the Ancestral Shape Hypothesis for intervertebral disc herniation. BMC Evolutionary Biology 19: 226.

2019

Plomp KA, Strand Viðarsdóttir U, Weston D, Dobney K, Collard M. Potential adaptations for bipedalism in the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae of H. sapiens: A 3D comparative analysis. Journal of Human Evolution 137: 102693.

2019

Timbrell L, Plomp KA. Investigating the strength of using basicranial portion of the temporal bone to distinguish between closely-related human populations using 3D geometric morphometrics. Journal of Archaeological Sciences Reports 26: 101885.

2016

Plomp KA, Boylston A. Frequency and patterns of costovertebral osteoarthritis in two Medieval English populations. International Journal of Paleopathology 14:64-68.

2015

Plomp KA, Strand Viðarsdóttir U, Weston D, Dobney K, Collard M. The ancestral shape hypothesis: An evolutionary explanation for the occurrence of intervertebral disc herniation in humans. BMC Evolutionary Biology 15: 68.

2015

Plomp KA, Roberts CA, Strand Viðarsdóttir U. Does the correlation between Schmorl's nodes and vertebral morphology extend into the lumbar spine? American Journal of Physical Anthropology 157: 526-534.

2015

Plomp KA, Roberts CA, Strand Viðarsdóttir U. Morphological characteristics of healthy and osteoarthritic joint surfaces in archaeological skeletons. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 25: 515-527.

2012

Plomp KA, Roberts CA, Strand Viðarsdóttir U. Vertebral morphology influences the development of Schmorl’s nodes in the lower thoracic spine. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 149(4): 572-582.

2012

Roberts CA, Bernofsky K, Cardoso FA, Henderson C, Jakob T, Plomp KA, Ponce P, Sharman J, Spencer R. Palaeopathology: studying the origin, evolution and frequency of disease in human remains from archaeological sites. UNESCO Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems.


Book Chapters

In press

Plomp KA, Roberts CA, Bentley G, Elton S. What's it all about? A legacy for the next generation of scholars in evolutionary medicine and palaeopathology. In: Plomp, KA, Roberts, CA, Bentley G, Elton S (eds). Evolving Health: Palaeopathology and Evolutionary Medicine. Oxford University Press.

In press

Plomp KA, Been E. The evolution of bipedalism and its impact on spinal pathologies and back pain. In: Plomp, KA, Roberts, CA, Bentley G, Elton S (eds). Evolving Health: Palaeopathology and Evolutionary Medicine. Oxford University Press.

In press

Bentley G, Roberts CA, Elton S, Plomp KA. Now you have read the volume, what next? In: Plomp, KA, Roberts, CA, Bentley G, Elton S (eds). Evolving Health: Palaeopathology and Evolutionary Medicine. Oxford University Press.

2017

Plomp KA. The bioarchaeology of back pain. In: Brynes J, Muller J. Bioarchaeology of Impairment and Disability: Theoretical, Ethnohistorical, and Methodological Perspectives. Springer. Pp: 141-157.


Conference Abstracts

2017

Plomp KA, Strand Viðarsdóttir U, Weston D, Dobney K, Collard M. Bipedalism evolved from knuckle-walking: Evidence from 3D geometric morphometric analyses of cervical and upper thoracic vertebral shape of Homo sapiens. Pan troglodytes, and Pongo pygmaeus. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 162: 148.

2015

Plomp KA, Strand Viðarsdóttir U, Weston D, Dobney K, Collard M. Ancestral Aches? 3D vertebral morphology, locomotion, and human spinal health. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 156: 254.

2014

Plomp KA, Strand Viðarsdóttir U, Weston D, Dobney K, Collard M. Ancestral Aches? Vertebral morphology, locomotion, and human spinal health. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 153: 209.

2013

Plomp KA, Strand Viðarsdóttir U, Roberts C. Applying anthropological shale analysis techniques to archaeological research: Overcoming problems and exploring possibilities. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 150: 277.

2012

Plomp KA, Strand Viðarsdóttir U, Roberts C. The shape of the spinal canal and Schmorl’s nodes: a two-dimensional shape analysis of lower thoracic vertebrae. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 147: 238.

2011

Plomp KA, Strand Viðarsdóttir U, Roberts C. Quantifying palaeopathology: Using geometric morphometrics to develop a quantifiable recording method for osteoarthritis. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 144: 240.